Project Sidewalk (Summer 2017)

For the summer after my junior year, I decided to get involved with undergraduate research at UMD’s Makeability Lab, part of its renowned Human Computer Interaction Lab. Working on Project Sidewalk, a web tool for virtually assessing urban accessibility, I helped implement new features, fix bugs in the codebase, and collect research data on how users interact with the tool. My team and I analyzed this data and conducted additional studies to write a research paper about crowdsourcing, which was awarded “Best Paper” at CHI 2019.

Technologies Used: HTML/CSS, JavaScript, Scala, PostgreSQL, Google Street View, Photoshop, Amazon Mechanical Turk, Various optimization tools

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 I created a choropleth that reflects how accessible various neighborhoods in DC are to people with movement disabilities.

I created a choropleth that reflects how accessible various neighborhoods in DC are to people with movement disabilities.

 Near the end of the summer, I collected and analyzed ground truth measurements to compare how experienced Project Sidewalk users assess obstacles vs. how newer users do.

Near the end of the summer, I collected and analyzed ground truth measurements to compare how experienced Project Sidewalk users assess obstacles vs. how newer users do.

 I helped iteratively design various pages throughout the site, such as this one, which is displayed when a mobile user tries accessing the mapping tool.

I helped iteratively design various pages throughout the site, such as this one, which is displayed when a mobile user tries accessing the mapping tool.

 In the process of optimizing the site, I became familiar with examining task managers and assessing what aspects of our pages caused browser strain.

In the process of optimizing the site, I became familiar with examining task managers and assessing what aspects of our pages caused browser strain.